TRACIE WILLIAMS
......................................................................................................................................................................................................................
      Every. Eight. Minutes.    Unknown to most, Laos is the most heavily bombed country in the world - per capita - in history.  More bombs were dropped on Laos between 1964 and 1973 than in all of WWII.  Approximately 2 million tons of ordnance landed on Laos soil when the CIA waged its “Secret War” on the small nation.   A bombing mission was carried out - on average - every 8 minutes for 9 years.   The aim was not only to eliminate the Communist Lao & North Vietnamese ground forces, but also to annihilate the Ho Chi Minh trail, which was used as the main supply route from North to South Vietnam.    During this time, more than 260 million cluster munitions were cast over Laos.  To this day, the Lao people refer familiarly to these tennis-ball sized bombs as “bombies."    Approximate failure rate of these cluster munitions was 30%.  An estimated 78 million active bombies currently contaminate the Laos landscape. The most heavily impacted areas are Laos' poorest districts.    Cluster munitions make up approximately 50% of the unexploded ordnance (UXO) that remains in Laos today.   These weapons attack indiscriminately and act as harsh reminders of a war that ended over 40 years ago. They continue to maim and kill in a country that is struggling to develop.  I used to live on the second floor of a concrete house, just off the banks of the Mekong River in Laos. From my rooftop I could wave to Thailand. The Lao owners of the house lived downstairs and must have been somewhat well to do, as all the other surrounding houses were made of wood and elevated on stilts to avoid flooding from the river during rainy season. Our house was directly under the flight path and during peak hours, air traffic was frequent. Hearing the planes pass overhead, I often wondered what it would have been like to live there during the war. Every. Eight. Minutes. For. Nine. Years.      Pictured above: A child gazes at the remains of a wat – one of 3 structures left standing after the war - in Xieng Khouang Province, Laos.

 

Every. Eight. Minutes.

Unknown to most, Laos is the most heavily bombed country in the world - per capita - in history.  More bombs were dropped on Laos between 1964 and 1973 than in all of WWII.  Approximately 2 million tons of ordnance landed on Laos soil when the CIA waged its “Secret War” on the small nation. 

A bombing mission was carried out - on average - every 8 minutes for 9 years. 

The aim was not only to eliminate the Communist Lao & North Vietnamese ground forces, but also to annihilate the Ho Chi Minh trail, which was used as the main supply route from North to South Vietnam.  

During this time, more than 260 million cluster munitions were cast over Laos.  To this day, the Lao people refer familiarly to these tennis-ball sized bombs as “bombies."  

Approximate failure rate of these cluster munitions was 30%.  An estimated 78 million active bombies currently contaminate the Laos landscape. The most heavily impacted areas are Laos' poorest districts.  

Cluster munitions make up approximately 50% of the unexploded ordnance (UXO) that remains in Laos today. 

These weapons attack indiscriminately and act as harsh reminders of a war that ended over 40 years ago. They continue to maim and kill in a country that is struggling to develop.

I used to live on the second floor of a concrete house, just off the banks of the Mekong River in Laos. From my rooftop I could wave to Thailand. The Lao owners of the house lived downstairs and must have been somewhat well to do, as all the other surrounding houses were made of wood and elevated on stilts to avoid flooding from the river during rainy season. Our house was directly under the flight path and during peak hours, air traffic was frequent. Hearing the planes pass overhead, I often wondered what it would have been like to live there during the war. Every. Eight. Minutes. For. Nine. Years. 

 

Pictured above: A child gazes at the remains of a wat – one of 3 structures left standing after the war - in Xieng Khouang Province, Laos.

 A child stands in front of a house built on stilts refashioned from cluster munition casings. Xieng
Khouang Province, Laos.

A child stands in front of a house built on stilts refashioned from cluster munition casings. Xieng Khouang Province, Laos.

 A mother and child relax in their home in Xieng Khouang Province, one of the most heavily
bombed areas in Laos.

A mother and child relax in their home in Xieng Khouang Province, one of the most heavily bombed areas in Laos.

 Latsamy lost his right eye, right hand and two fingers on his left hand when an explosion occurred while he was collecting scrap metal from UXO. He is an active campaigner for the rights of survivors and the international ban of cluster munitions as a member of the  Lao Ban Advocates (Handicap International) .

Latsamy lost his right eye, right hand and two fingers on his left hand when an explosion occurred while he was collecting scrap metal from UXO. He is an active campaigner for the rights of survivors and the international ban of cluster munitions as a member of the Lao Ban Advocates (Handicap International).

 A clearance worker unearths half of a live BLU 63 cluster muntion. Savannakhet Province, Laos. 
		
	
	  

A clearance worker unearths half of a live BLU 63 cluster muntion. Savannakhet Province, Laos.

 
 In 2004, Soung lost both his arms when a cluster munition exploded while attempting to collect the scrap metal for a lucrative profit. He has now lost his eyesight and considers himself a burden to his wife and five children.  Xieng Khouang Province, Laos.

In 2004, Soung lost both his arms when a cluster munition exploded while
attempting to collect the scrap metal for a lucrative profit. He has now lost
his eyesight and considers himself a burden to his wife and five children. 
Xieng Khouang Province, Laos.

 Approximately 10 meters behind a family’s home lies a hidden BLU 63 cluster munition – also familiarly referred to as a “bombie” - the most common type of cluster munition found in Laos. Savannakhet Province, Laos.   

Approximately 10 meters behind a family’s home lies a hidden BLU 63
cluster munition – also familiarly referred to as a “bombie” - the most
common type of cluster munition found in Laos.
Savannakhet Province, Laos.

 

  “I never thought I’d become a man like this.”   Bounmy was injured in 1996 while digging a fishpond behind his house when he accidentally struck a cluster munition. Bounmy is an active campaigner for the rights of survivors and the international ban of cluster munitions as a member of the  Lao Ban Advocates (Handicap International).      

“I never thought I’d become a man like this.”

Bounmy was injured in 1996 while digging a fishpond behind his house when he accidentally struck a cluster munition.
Bounmy is an active campaigner for the rights of survivors and the international ban of cluster munitions as a member of
the Lao Ban Advocates (Handicap International).
 

 

 Cluster munition canisters rest next to stacked Beer Laos crates. Each tube  would house approx.
19 BLU 3 cluster munitions, known locally as "pineapples"  due to their appearance. Typically 6
tubes would be bundled together - known  as a CBU 14 - totaling 114 deadly bomblets.
Savannakhet Province, Laos.  ​

Cluster munition canisters rest next to stacked Beer Laos crates. Each tube
would house approx. 19 BLU 3 cluster munitions, known locally as "pineapples"
due to their appearance. Typically 6 tubes would be bundled together - known
as a CBU 14 - totaling 114 deadly bomblets. Savannakhet Province, Laos.

  “For one week following the accident - in complete darkness – you could  still see me, similar to a
light.”   
		   Lone - 47 years old - was injured as a boy in 1979 when he found a canister  containing cluster
bombs filled with white phosphorus. Lone’s belt is made  from UXO.  Savannakhet Province, Laos  ​

“For one week following the accident - in complete darkness – you could
still see me, similar to a light.”

Lone - 47 years old - was injured as a boy in 1979 when he found a canister
containing cluster bombs filled with white phosphorus. Lone’s belt is made
from UXO.  Savannakhet Province, Laos

  ​“For one week following the accident - in complete darkness – you could still see me, similar to a
light.”     
Lone - 47 years old - was injured as a boy in 1979 when he found a canister containing cluster
bombs filled with white phosphorus. Lone’s belt is made from UXO. Savannakhet Province, Laos  
		 ​

​“For one week following the accident - in complete darkness – you could still see me, similar to a light.”

Lone - 47 years old - was injured as a boy in 1979 when he found a canister containing cluster bombs filled with white phosphorus. Lone’s belt is made from UXO. Savannakhet Province, Laos 

 At the current rate of clearance, it is estimated that at will take 1,500 years to completely rid the land of explosives.  Sang was injured while working as an employee to clear land in 2001.           

At the current rate of clearance, it is estimated that at will take 1,500 years to completely rid the land of explosives.

Sang was injured while working as an employee to clear land in 2001.

 

 

 

 Sang - 30 years old - was injured while working as an employee to clear land in 2001.  ​

Sang - 30 years old - was injured while working as an employee to clear land in 2001.

 Singin lost his leg fighting as a soldier during the war. For over 30 years, he  walked around with his homemade leg - created from wood, scraps of UXO  & a flip-flop - until he received his first prosthetic device from
COPE, a local  project that supports the government run service who provides prosthetics,  mobility devices, and rehabilitation to those who cannot afford to pay.   Kammoune Province, Laos.     ​

Singin lost his leg fighting as a soldier during the war. For over 30 years, he
walked around with his homemade leg - created from wood, scraps of UXO
& a flip-flop - until he received his first prosthetic device from COPE, a local
project that supports the government run service who provides prosthetics,
mobility devices, and rehabilitation to those who cannot afford to pay.  
Kammoune Province, Laos. 

 Singin lost his leg fighting as a soldier during the war. For over 30 years he walked around with his homemade leg - created from wood, scraps of UXO & a flip-flop - until he received his first prosthetic device from  COPE , a local project who supports the government run service in providing rehabilitation services and mobility devices free of charge to those who cannot afford to pay. Kammoune Province, Laos.    

Singin lost his leg fighting as a soldier during the war. For over 30 years he walked around with his homemade leg - created from wood, scraps of UXO & a flip-flop - until he received his first prosthetic device from COPE, a local project who supports the government run service in providing rehabilitation services and mobility devices free of charge to those who cannot afford to pay. Kammoune Province, Laos. 

 

 Among the family pictures, plates adorned with Ho Chi Minh’s face, and other sentimentals rest
two small bomb casings in an Internet shop. Xieng Khouang Province, Laos.  ​

Among the family pictures, plates adorned with Ho Chi Minh’s face, and other sentimentals rest two small bomb casings in an Internet shop. Xieng Khouang Province, Laos.

 ​In 2004 - at the age of 9 – Hamm lost his life due to a cluster munition accident. Kammoune
Province, Laos.

​In 2004 - at the age of 9 – Hamm lost his life due to a cluster munition accident. Kammoune Province, Laos.

 ​A BLU 3 cluster muntion - familiarly referred to as a “pineapple” - sits on a shelf next to canned
sardines in a local shop. Xieng Khouang Province, Laos

​A BLU 3 cluster muntion - familiarly referred to as a “pineapple” - sits on a shelf next to canned sardines in a local shop. Xieng Khouang Province, Laos

  “The bombs not only broke our bodies, they broke our hearts.”   Phongsavath was injured in 2008 - at the age of 17 - when he unknowingly picked up a cluster munition. The explosion resulted in him losing both his hands and his eyesight. .   Phongsavath, who now goes by the name of PeterKIm, is an active campaigner for the rights of survivors and the international ban of cluster munitions as a member of the  Lao Ban Advocates (Handicap International) . He is also a dancer with  Lao Bang Fai  - a break dance collective whose mission is to "provide young people with education, recreational activities and to raise awareness on the social problems affecting the youth in a time of social change." Vientiane Province, Laos

“The bombs not only broke our bodies, they broke our hearts.”

Phongsavath was injured in 2008 - at the age of 17 - when he unknowingly picked up a cluster munition. The explosion resulted in him losing both his hands and his eyesight. . 

Phongsavath, who now goes by the name of PeterKIm, is an active campaigner for the rights of survivors and the international ban of cluster munitions as a member of the Lao Ban Advocates (Handicap International). He is also a dancer with Lao Bang Fai - a break dance collective whose mission is to "provide young people with education, recreational activities and to raise awareness on the social problems affecting the youth in a time of social change." Vientiane Province, Laos

 ​Grandfather Kampouvieng explains how for the first 3 years of the war he hid underground and
as his frustrations grew, he decided to fight. He was a French language teacher for many years
and he now owns a shop where he exhibits bombs to educate the youth of their dangers. Xieng
Khouang Province, Laos

​Grandfather Kampouvieng explains how for the first 3 years of the war he hid underground and as his frustrations grew, he decided to fight. He was a French language teacher for many years and he now owns a shop where he exhibits bombs to educate the youth of their dangers. Xieng Khouang Province, Laos

 Ta’s child fondly caresses the prosthetic of her father who lost both his arms and his right eye when he attempted to open a cluster muntion to remove the explosives for fishing.  Ta received his prosthetic arms from  COPE  - a local project who supports the government run service in providing rehabilitation services and mobility devices free of charge to those who cannot afford to pay. Kammoune Province, Laos.    

Ta’s child fondly caresses the prosthetic of her father who lost both his arms and his right eye when he attempted to open a cluster muntion to remove the explosives for fishing.

Ta received his prosthetic arms from COPE - a local project who supports the government run service in providing rehabilitation services and mobility devices free of charge to those who cannot afford to pay. Kammoune Province, Laos. 

 

 ​A grandmother sits with her grandchildren as their land is cleared of UXO which will enable to
them to farm safely. Savannakhet Province, Laos.

​A grandmother sits with her grandchildren as their land is cleared of UXO which will enable to them to farm safely. Savannakhet Province, Laos.

 

Every. Eight. Minutes.

Unknown to most, Laos is the most heavily bombed country in the world - per capita - in history.  More bombs were dropped on Laos between 1964 and 1973 than in all of WWII.  Approximately 2 million tons of ordnance landed on Laos soil when the CIA waged its “Secret War” on the small nation. 

A bombing mission was carried out - on average - every 8 minutes for 9 years. 

The aim was not only to eliminate the Communist Lao & North Vietnamese ground forces, but also to annihilate the Ho Chi Minh trail, which was used as the main supply route from North to South Vietnam.  

During this time, more than 260 million cluster munitions were cast over Laos.  To this day, the Lao people refer familiarly to these tennis-ball sized bombs as “bombies."  

Approximate failure rate of these cluster munitions was 30%.  An estimated 78 million active bombies currently contaminate the Laos landscape. The most heavily impacted areas are Laos' poorest districts.  

Cluster munitions make up approximately 50% of the unexploded ordnance (UXO) that remains in Laos today. 

These weapons attack indiscriminately and act as harsh reminders of a war that ended over 40 years ago. They continue to maim and kill in a country that is struggling to develop.

I used to live on the second floor of a concrete house, just off the banks of the Mekong River in Laos. From my rooftop I could wave to Thailand. The Lao owners of the house lived downstairs and must have been somewhat well to do, as all the other surrounding houses were made of wood and elevated on stilts to avoid flooding from the river during rainy season. Our house was directly under the flight path and during peak hours, air traffic was frequent. Hearing the planes pass overhead, I often wondered what it would have been like to live there during the war. Every. Eight. Minutes. For. Nine. Years. 

 

Pictured above: A child gazes at the remains of a wat – one of 3 structures left standing after the war - in Xieng Khouang Province, Laos.

A child stands in front of a house built on stilts refashioned from cluster munition casings. Xieng Khouang Province, Laos.

A mother and child relax in their home in Xieng Khouang Province, one of the most heavily bombed areas in Laos.

Latsamy lost his right eye, right hand and two fingers on his left hand when an explosion occurred while he was collecting scrap metal from UXO. He is an active campaigner for the rights of survivors and the international ban of cluster munitions as a member of the Lao Ban Advocates (Handicap International).

A clearance worker unearths half of a live BLU 63 cluster muntion. Savannakhet Province, Laos.

 

In 2004, Soung lost both his arms when a cluster munition exploded while
attempting to collect the scrap metal for a lucrative profit. He has now lost
his eyesight and considers himself a burden to his wife and five children. 
Xieng Khouang Province, Laos.

Approximately 10 meters behind a family’s home lies a hidden BLU 63
cluster munition – also familiarly referred to as a “bombie” - the most
common type of cluster munition found in Laos.
Savannakhet Province, Laos.

 

“I never thought I’d become a man like this.”

Bounmy was injured in 1996 while digging a fishpond behind his house when he accidentally struck a cluster munition.
Bounmy is an active campaigner for the rights of survivors and the international ban of cluster munitions as a member of
the Lao Ban Advocates (Handicap International).
 

 

Cluster munition canisters rest next to stacked Beer Laos crates. Each tube
would house approx. 19 BLU 3 cluster munitions, known locally as "pineapples"
due to their appearance. Typically 6 tubes would be bundled together - known
as a CBU 14 - totaling 114 deadly bomblets. Savannakhet Province, Laos.

“For one week following the accident - in complete darkness – you could
still see me, similar to a light.”

Lone - 47 years old - was injured as a boy in 1979 when he found a canister
containing cluster bombs filled with white phosphorus. Lone’s belt is made
from UXO.  Savannakhet Province, Laos

​“For one week following the accident - in complete darkness – you could still see me, similar to a light.”

Lone - 47 years old - was injured as a boy in 1979 when he found a canister containing cluster bombs filled with white phosphorus. Lone’s belt is made from UXO. Savannakhet Province, Laos 

At the current rate of clearance, it is estimated that at will take 1,500 years to completely rid the land of explosives.

Sang was injured while working as an employee to clear land in 2001.

 

 

 

Sang - 30 years old - was injured while working as an employee to clear land in 2001.

Singin lost his leg fighting as a soldier during the war. For over 30 years, he
walked around with his homemade leg - created from wood, scraps of UXO
& a flip-flop - until he received his first prosthetic device from COPE, a local
project that supports the government run service who provides prosthetics,
mobility devices, and rehabilitation to those who cannot afford to pay.  
Kammoune Province, Laos. 

Singin lost his leg fighting as a soldier during the war. For over 30 years he walked around with his homemade leg - created from wood, scraps of UXO & a flip-flop - until he received his first prosthetic device from COPE, a local project who supports the government run service in providing rehabilitation services and mobility devices free of charge to those who cannot afford to pay. Kammoune Province, Laos. 

 

Among the family pictures, plates adorned with Ho Chi Minh’s face, and other sentimentals rest two small bomb casings in an Internet shop. Xieng Khouang Province, Laos.

​In 2004 - at the age of 9 – Hamm lost his life due to a cluster munition accident. Kammoune Province, Laos.

​A BLU 3 cluster muntion - familiarly referred to as a “pineapple” - sits on a shelf next to canned sardines in a local shop. Xieng Khouang Province, Laos

“The bombs not only broke our bodies, they broke our hearts.”

Phongsavath was injured in 2008 - at the age of 17 - when he unknowingly picked up a cluster munition. The explosion resulted in him losing both his hands and his eyesight. . 

Phongsavath, who now goes by the name of PeterKIm, is an active campaigner for the rights of survivors and the international ban of cluster munitions as a member of the Lao Ban Advocates (Handicap International). He is also a dancer with Lao Bang Fai - a break dance collective whose mission is to "provide young people with education, recreational activities and to raise awareness on the social problems affecting the youth in a time of social change." Vientiane Province, Laos

​Grandfather Kampouvieng explains how for the first 3 years of the war he hid underground and as his frustrations grew, he decided to fight. He was a French language teacher for many years and he now owns a shop where he exhibits bombs to educate the youth of their dangers. Xieng Khouang Province, Laos

Ta’s child fondly caresses the prosthetic of her father who lost both his arms and his right eye when he attempted to open a cluster muntion to remove the explosives for fishing.

Ta received his prosthetic arms from COPE - a local project who supports the government run service in providing rehabilitation services and mobility devices free of charge to those who cannot afford to pay. Kammoune Province, Laos. 

 

​A grandmother sits with her grandchildren as their land is cleared of UXO which will enable to them to farm safely. Savannakhet Province, Laos.

      Every. Eight. Minutes.    Unknown to most, Laos is the most heavily bombed country in the world - per capita - in history.  More bombs were dropped on Laos between 1964 and 1973 than in all of WWII.  Approximately 2 million tons of ordnance landed on Laos soil when the CIA waged its “Secret War” on the small nation.   A bombing mission was carried out - on average - every 8 minutes for 9 years.   The aim was not only to eliminate the Communist Lao & North Vietnamese ground forces, but also to annihilate the Ho Chi Minh trail, which was used as the main supply route from North to South Vietnam.    During this time, more than 260 million cluster munitions were cast over Laos.  To this day, the Lao people refer familiarly to these tennis-ball sized bombs as “bombies."    Approximate failure rate of these cluster munitions was 30%.  An estimated 78 million active bombies currently contaminate the Laos landscape. The most heavily impacted areas are Laos' poorest districts.    Cluster munitions make up approximately 50% of the unexploded ordnance (UXO) that remains in Laos today.   These weapons attack indiscriminately and act as harsh reminders of a war that ended over 40 years ago. They continue to maim and kill in a country that is struggling to develop.  I used to live on the second floor of a concrete house, just off the banks of the Mekong River in Laos. From my rooftop I could wave to Thailand. The Lao owners of the house lived downstairs and must have been somewhat well to do, as all the other surrounding houses were made of wood and elevated on stilts to avoid flooding from the river during rainy season. Our house was directly under the flight path and during peak hours, air traffic was frequent. Hearing the planes pass overhead, I often wondered what it would have been like to live there during the war. Every. Eight. Minutes. For. Nine. Years.      Pictured above: A child gazes at the remains of a wat – one of 3 structures left standing after the war - in Xieng Khouang Province, Laos.
 A child stands in front of a house built on stilts refashioned from cluster munition casings. Xieng
Khouang Province, Laos.
 A mother and child relax in their home in Xieng Khouang Province, one of the most heavily
bombed areas in Laos.
 Latsamy lost his right eye, right hand and two fingers on his left hand when an explosion occurred while he was collecting scrap metal from UXO. He is an active campaigner for the rights of survivors and the international ban of cluster munitions as a member of the  Lao Ban Advocates (Handicap International) .
 A clearance worker unearths half of a live BLU 63 cluster muntion. Savannakhet Province, Laos. 
		
	
	  
 In 2004, Soung lost both his arms when a cluster munition exploded while attempting to collect the scrap metal for a lucrative profit. He has now lost his eyesight and considers himself a burden to his wife and five children.  Xieng Khouang Province, Laos.
 Approximately 10 meters behind a family’s home lies a hidden BLU 63 cluster munition – also familiarly referred to as a “bombie” - the most common type of cluster munition found in Laos. Savannakhet Province, Laos.   
  “I never thought I’d become a man like this.”   Bounmy was injured in 1996 while digging a fishpond behind his house when he accidentally struck a cluster munition. Bounmy is an active campaigner for the rights of survivors and the international ban of cluster munitions as a member of the  Lao Ban Advocates (Handicap International).      
 Cluster munition canisters rest next to stacked Beer Laos crates. Each tube  would house approx.
19 BLU 3 cluster munitions, known locally as "pineapples"  due to their appearance. Typically 6
tubes would be bundled together - known  as a CBU 14 - totaling 114 deadly bomblets.
Savannakhet Province, Laos.  ​
  “For one week following the accident - in complete darkness – you could  still see me, similar to a
light.”   
		   Lone - 47 years old - was injured as a boy in 1979 when he found a canister  containing cluster
bombs filled with white phosphorus. Lone’s belt is made  from UXO.  Savannakhet Province, Laos  ​
  ​“For one week following the accident - in complete darkness – you could still see me, similar to a
light.”     
Lone - 47 years old - was injured as a boy in 1979 when he found a canister containing cluster
bombs filled with white phosphorus. Lone’s belt is made from UXO. Savannakhet Province, Laos  
		 ​
 At the current rate of clearance, it is estimated that at will take 1,500 years to completely rid the land of explosives.  Sang was injured while working as an employee to clear land in 2001.           
 Sang - 30 years old - was injured while working as an employee to clear land in 2001.  ​
 Singin lost his leg fighting as a soldier during the war. For over 30 years, he  walked around with his homemade leg - created from wood, scraps of UXO  & a flip-flop - until he received his first prosthetic device from
COPE, a local  project that supports the government run service who provides prosthetics,  mobility devices, and rehabilitation to those who cannot afford to pay.   Kammoune Province, Laos.     ​
 Singin lost his leg fighting as a soldier during the war. For over 30 years he walked around with his homemade leg - created from wood, scraps of UXO & a flip-flop - until he received his first prosthetic device from  COPE , a local project who supports the government run service in providing rehabilitation services and mobility devices free of charge to those who cannot afford to pay. Kammoune Province, Laos.    
 Among the family pictures, plates adorned with Ho Chi Minh’s face, and other sentimentals rest
two small bomb casings in an Internet shop. Xieng Khouang Province, Laos.  ​
 ​In 2004 - at the age of 9 – Hamm lost his life due to a cluster munition accident. Kammoune
Province, Laos.
 ​A BLU 3 cluster muntion - familiarly referred to as a “pineapple” - sits on a shelf next to canned
sardines in a local shop. Xieng Khouang Province, Laos
  “The bombs not only broke our bodies, they broke our hearts.”   Phongsavath was injured in 2008 - at the age of 17 - when he unknowingly picked up a cluster munition. The explosion resulted in him losing both his hands and his eyesight. .   Phongsavath, who now goes by the name of PeterKIm, is an active campaigner for the rights of survivors and the international ban of cluster munitions as a member of the  Lao Ban Advocates (Handicap International) . He is also a dancer with  Lao Bang Fai  - a break dance collective whose mission is to "provide young people with education, recreational activities and to raise awareness on the social problems affecting the youth in a time of social change." Vientiane Province, Laos
 ​Grandfather Kampouvieng explains how for the first 3 years of the war he hid underground and
as his frustrations grew, he decided to fight. He was a French language teacher for many years
and he now owns a shop where he exhibits bombs to educate the youth of their dangers. Xieng
Khouang Province, Laos
 Ta’s child fondly caresses the prosthetic of her father who lost both his arms and his right eye when he attempted to open a cluster muntion to remove the explosives for fishing.  Ta received his prosthetic arms from  COPE  - a local project who supports the government run service in providing rehabilitation services and mobility devices free of charge to those who cannot afford to pay. Kammoune Province, Laos.    
 ​A grandmother sits with her grandchildren as their land is cleared of UXO which will enable to
them to farm safely. Savannakhet Province, Laos.